Air Conditioner Repair Estimate – How Much Will It Cost To Repair Your AC?

The sudden loss of cooling leaves many homeowners in a state of panic. Not only are you sweating it out due to the temperature, but the anticipated cost of repairs may be leaving you a bit hot under the collar.

Don’t sweat, we’re here to share what prices to expect when it comes to air conditioning repair cost estimates. Also, learn what you can do to resolve system issues yourself and save on air conditioner repair costs.

Air Conditioning Repair Cost: Service Call

When your cooling system is down, the first air conditioning repair cost you’re looking at is the service call charge. Most air conditioning repair companies charge this fee to cover their time and diagnostics to assess your system.

Most service call fees run you from approximately $50 to $100. In the case of an emergency air conditioner repair over the weekend, overnight, or on a holiday, you may be looking at double this air conditioning repair cost for an emergency fee.

Many air conditioning contractors offer coupons or other savings that cover the service call. Be sure to check your contractor’s website or ask their scheduler what deals may be available.

Air Conditioning Repair Cost: Parts and Labor

Once your HVAC contractor assesses your cooling system, he or she provides you with an air conditioning repair cost estimate for the fixes your system needs. This typically includes both parts and labor, unless otherwise stated.

Air conditioning repair costs vary based on the exact problem you face. The average air conditioning repair cost for homeowners in the United States is around $300. Below, see a breakdown of what you can expect to pay depending on what has malfunctioned within your system.

  • Flush condensate drain line: $75 to $250
  • Replace drip pan: $250 to $575
  • Replace condensate drain line: $20
  • Replace condensate drain pump: $240 to $450
  • Repair refrigerant leak: $200 to $1,500
  • Recharge refrigerant: $250 to $750
  • Replace condenser coil: $1,900 to $2,900
  • Replace compressor: $1,900
  • Repair fan motor: $200 to $650
  • Replace relays, breakers, or fuses: $75 to $290

Troubleshooting to Avoid Air Conditioning Repair Cost

We know these prices seem like a lot, but sometimes, professional repairs are the only way to restore your air conditioner’s function. But, it’s always a smart idea to perform some troubleshooting steps before you resign to pay air conditioning repair costs.

Many issues with an air conditioning system can be chalked up to simple errors, which are fixable by homeowners who don’t possess technical HVAC knowledge. Issues that stem from the system’s power source or the air filter may be an easy fix.

Troubleshoot AC Power Source Issues

  • Start with your thermostat. Double-check settings to ensure they are correct. The cool mode should be selected and the temperate should be set a few degrees under your home’s current temperature. Ensure hold or vacation modes are off.
  • Check your thermostat’s batteries. If hardwired, check your breaker box to ensure the breaker that powers the thermostat has not tripped.
  • Check the exterior on/off switches near your indoor air handler and outdoor condenser unit – make sure they are set on. The switches are usually located on the unit or on the wall nearby. Check your breaker panel again to see that power has not been cut to the equipment by a tripped breaker.

Troubleshoot AC Filter Issues

  • Check to ensure your filter is inserted into the filter cabinet in the correct direction. Check the airflow indicators that are printed on the filter’s frame. The filter should fit snugly within the compartment and be the correct size.
  • If your filter is dirty, replace it with a clean filter. If you have a washable model filter, follow the manufacturer’s instructions for cleaning and allow it to thoroughly dry before reinsertion.

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